adorus:

breda grote markt by *Imogen on Flickr.

cesaray:

cersei lannister: a summary

cesaray:

cersei lannister: a summary

(via liamdryden)


everydaylouie:

subway, above ground

everydaylouie:

subway, above ground


bobbycaputo:

The Blue Arch of a Mosque in Esfahan
Photo and caption by Tandis Khodadadian (Woodland Hills, CA); Photographed April 2013, Esfahan, Iran

bobbycaputo:

The Blue Arch of a Mosque in Esfahan

Photo and caption by Tandis Khodadadian (Woodland Hills, CA); Photographed April 2013, Esfahan, Iran

(Source: smithsonianmag.com, via thegestianpoet)


ybee:

two years apart!!

(via justinripley)


chocosweete:

arya stark 

chocosweete:

arya stark 


quantrax:

The Writers Museum, just off the Royal Mile, Edinburgh.

quantrax:

The Writers Museum, just off the Royal Mile, Edinburgh.

(via fuckyeahedinburgh)


I wouldn’t mind, but splitting children’s books strictly along gender lines is not even good publishing. Just like other successful children’s books, The Hunger Games was not aimed at girls or boys; like JK Rowling, Roald Dahl, Robert Muchamore and others, Collins just wrote great stories, and readers bought them in their millions. Now, Dahl’s Matilda is published with a pink cover, and I have heard one bookseller report seeing a mother snatching a copy from her small son’s hands saying “That’s for girls” as she replaced it on the shelf.

You see, it is not just girls’ ambitions that are being frustrated by the limiting effects of “books for girls”, in which girls’ roles are all passive, domestic and in front of a mirror. Rebecca Davies, who writes the children’s books blog at Independent.co.uk, tells me that she is equally sick of receiving “books which have been commissioned solely for the purpose of ‘getting boys reading’ [and which have] all-male characters and thin, action-based plots.” What we are doing by pigeon-holing children is badly letting them down. And books, above all things, should be available to any child who is interested in them.

Happily, as the literary editor of The Independent on Sunday, there is something that I can do about this. So I promise now that the newspaper and this website will not be reviewing any book which is explicitly aimed at just girls, or just boys. Nor will The Independent’s books section. And nor will the children’s books blog at Independent.co.uk. Any Girls’ Book of Boring Princesses that crosses my desk will go straight into the recycling pile along with every Great Big Book of Snot for Boys. If you are a publisher with enough faith in your new book that you think it will appeal to all children, we’ll be very happy to hear from you. But the next Harry Potter or Katniss Everdeen will not come in glittery pink covers. So we’d thank you not to send us such books at all.


(Source: kevc, via saintofsass)


newyorker:

This past February, thanks to an unusually cold winter, the sea caves along the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, in northern Wisconsin, were accessible by foot for the first time in five years. Take a look at Erin Brethauer’s photos of the ice formations: http://nyr.kr/1mcY2ql

(Source: newyorker.com)



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